Granger 2015 Redox Biol

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Granger DN, Kvietys PR (2015) Reperfusion injury and reactive oxygen species: The evolution of a concept. Redox Biol 6:524-551. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2015.08.020

Β» PMID: 26484802 Open Access

Granger DN, Kvietys PR (2015) Redox Biol

Abstract: Reperfusion injury, the paradoxical tissue response that is manifested by blood flow-deprived and oxygen-starved organs following the restoration of blood flow and tissue oxygenation, has been a focus of basic and clinical research for over 4-decades. While a variety of molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) continues to receive much attention as a critical factor in the genesis of reperfusion injury. As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to identifying the dominant cellular and enzymatic sources of excess ROS production following ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Of the potential ROS sources described to date, xanthine oxidase, NADPH oxidase (Nox), mitochondria, and uncoupled nitric oxide synthase have gained a status as the most likely contributors to reperfusion-induced oxidative stress and represent priority targets for therapeutic intervention against reperfusion-induced organ dysfunction and tissue damage. Although all four enzymatic sources are present in most tissues and are likely to play some role in reperfusion injury, priority and emphasis has been given to specific ROS sources that are enriched in certain tissues, such as xanthine oxidase in the gastrointestinal tract and mitochondria in the metabolically active heart and brain. The possibility that multiple ROS sources contribute to reperfusion injury in most tissues is supported by evidence demonstrating that redox-signaling enables ROS produced by one enzymatic source (e.g., Nox) to activate and enhance ROS production by a second source (e.g., mitochondria). This review provides a synopsis of the evidence implicating ROS in reperfusion injury, the clinical implications of this phenomenon, and summarizes current understanding of the four most frequently invoked enzymatic sources of ROS production in post-ischemic tissue.

β€’ Bioblast editor: Gnaiger E

Granger 2015 Redox Biol CORRECTION.png

Correction: FADH2 and Complex II

Ambiguity alert.png
FADH2 is shown as the substrate feeding electrons into Complex II (CII). This is wrong and requires correction - for details see Gnaiger (2024).
Gnaiger E (2024) Complex II ambiguities ― FADH2 in the electron transfer system. J Biol Chem 300:105470. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbc.2023.105470 - Β»Bioblast linkΒ«

Hydrogen ion ambiguities in the electron transfer system

Communicated by Gnaiger E (2023-10-08) last update 2023-11-10
Electron (e-) transfer linked to hydrogen ion (hydron; H+) transfer is a fundamental concept in the field of bioenergetics, critical for understanding redox-coupled energy transformations.
Ambiguity alert H+.png
However, the current literature contains inconsistencies regarding H+ formation on the negative side of bioenergetic membranes, such as the matrix side of the mitochondrial inner membrane, when NADH is oxidized during oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Ambiguities arise when examining the oxidation of NADH by respiratory Complex I or succinate by Complex II.
Ambiguity alert e-.png
Oxidation of NADH or succinate involves a two-electron transfer of 2{H++e-} to FMN or FAD, respectively. Figures indicating a single electron e- transferred from NADH or succinate lack accuracy.
Ambiguity alert NAD.png
The oxidized NAD+ is distinguished from NAD indicating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide independent of oxidation state.
NADH + H+ β†’ NAD+ +2{H++e-} is the oxidation half-reaction in this H+-linked electron transfer represented as 2{H++e-} (Gnaiger 2023). Putative H+ formation shown as NADH β†’ NAD+ + H+ conflicts with chemiosmotic coupling stoichiometries between H+ translocation across the coupling membrane and electron transfer to oxygen. Ensuring clarity in this complex field is imperative to tackle the apparent ambiguity crisis and prevent confusion, particularly in light of the increasing number of interdisciplinary publications on bioenergetics concerning diagnostic and clinical applications of OXPHOS analysis.

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Enzyme: Complex II;succinate dehydrogenase 




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